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ProQuest - New York Times (1851 - 2003)

Introduction

ProQuest - New York Times (1851 - 2003) provides digital FULL TEXT of almost 150 years of one of the best English language newspapers in the world. The New York Times (1851-2003) offers full page and article images with searchable full text back to the first issue. The collection includes digital reproductions providing access to every page from every available issue. The coverage for this database is from Sept 18,1851 to Dec 31, 2003, and it is comprised of over 25 million articles, includes news stories, editorials, photos, graphics, and advertisements. Researchers can search by keywords to find the exact article or they can browse through issues page by page seeing each story in the context of the ads, the weather, and the popular entertainment of the day.

After locating an interesting article simply click on the link marked Article image - PDF to view it and print it. These full-text PDF files require the free Adobe Acrobat Reader for displaying and printing.

ProQuest - New York Times (1851 - 2003) is available to current UT Arlington faculty and students at this web address:

libguides.uta.edu/histnyt

Searching

The key truncation symbol in ProQuest - New York Times (1851 - 2003) is the asterisk (*), and when this symbol is put at the end of a word, the database will be searched for all of the possible endings--suffixes--for that word. For example, the command terror* will search for the words terror, terrorism, and terrorist.

A phrase is indicated with quotation marks (" ") so that words that are surrounded by quotation marks are searched as a single string. For example, "welfare reform" will be searched as a two word phrase.

Two Boolean operators that are important in finding information are AND and OR. The AND is used to connect two different concepts and the OR is used between concepts that are synonymous. It is critical to put parentheses around a search expression that contains an OR. Here is an example:

("gay marriage" OR "homosex* couple*" OR "same-sex union*" OR "same-sex couple*")

and

(polic* OR law* OR legislat*)

The first part of this statement will find material about gay marriage or same-sex unions. The second part will look for the words "policy" or "policies" or laws or legislation. The AND then links the first set with the second. This should be an effective way to find newspaper articles that report on some aspects of the changing legal environment for homosexuals.


John Dillard, Social Sciences Librarian -- dillard@uta.edu


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